4 Weeks to a Flatter Stomach

Do you want to know how to turn your belly pooch into a flatter stomach? If you are like most people, the answer is a loud and clear, “YES!” You can definitely achieve a smoother and flatter stomach than you have right now just by following these simple tips in this article for 30 days

Do you want to know how to turn your belly pooch into a flatter stomach? If you are like most people,Guest Posting the answer is a loud and clear, “YES!”

You can definitely achieve a smoother and flatter stomach than you have right now just by following these simple tips in this article for 30 days. You will be amazed at how effectively they work.

In brief, high-grade nutrition is one of the most essential factors to weight loss and a flat stomach. Cardiovascular exercise, too, has its place. When you combine quality nutrition with the right cardio program, you have a killer recipe for fat loss. The benefits of adding cardio to your exercise program are limitless.

Cardio:

Burns calories

Boosts your metabolism

Decreases stress and anxiety

Burns fat

Improves sleep

Improved endurance

Improves heart and lung function

Creates a sense of euphoria

No More Boring Cardio

Many people get discouraged when doing cardio because it’s boring to them. Cardio exercise is not limited to walking on a treadmill. The days of boring cardio are over. Cardio can be fun and invigorating. There are many different forms of cardio that you can implement to break out of that same boring routine. Using a variety can make cardio fun and enjoyable.

Great forms of cardio:

Jogging

Sprinting

Power walking

Aerobic class

Spinning class

Running stadiums

Swimming

Cycling

Hiking

Best Time To Do Cardio

There has been a lot of debate regarding “the absolute best time to do cardio.” The best time to do cardio is when it’s best for you.

The discussion of fasted cardio is also a topic that has been beaten to death. Does fasted cardio burn muscle? Fasted cardio only burns muscle if you are not eating enough food of quality. Under-eating combined with fasted cardio equals muscle loss.

Kicking Up Cardio To Burn Fat

You can take your cardio to a new level and crank up your fat-burning process by implementing HIIT (high-intensity interval training) which is alternating short bursts of high-intensity with moderate recovery periods.

Taking Your Fat Burning To New Levels

While cardio is a fat-loss advantage in any fitness program, a diet consisting of quality foods and strength training exercises creates a defense shield to prevent fat gain. For a well-rounded fitness program, include all three components (good nutrition, strength training, and cardio).

Conclusion to 4 Weeks to a Flatter Stomach

There you have it: When you are armed with the facts and implement them consistently, you have nothing to lose but fat and you will be pleased with your final outcome. Challenge yourself right now and start combining these simple methods to accomplish a flatter stomach. In 30 days you’ll be happy that you did.

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ADHD and Food Allergies

ADHD and Food Allergies

by Anthony Kane,Guest Posting MD

Introduction

There are a number of controversial areas in medicine when it comes to ADHD. Food allergy is certainly one of them.

The classic allergic reaction, which is classified as the type-1 hypersensitivity reaction, can be elicited by food, but this is fairly uncommon. When we discuss food sensitivities in ADHD we are discussing a different, not well-defined, mechanism.

One of the main progenitors of the food allergy/ADHD connection is Dr. Doris Rapp. Dr. Rapp was a pediatric allergist who noticed that many children in her practice had significant physical and behavioral changes when exposed to certain foods. They may have red ear lobes, dark circles under their eyes, or glazed eyes after eating certain foods. These children could have tremendous swings in behavior. They can be calm one minute and wildly hyperactive a few minutes later.

To make it more interesting, children with food allergies usually crave the food that affects them negatively. That means a child who is allergic to peanuts will demand peanut butter and jelly for lunch everyday, and for the rest of the afternoon you have to peel him off of the ceiling.

What is Food Allergy?

The classic allergic reaction operates through a very specific mechanism. The reaction is caused when a specific type of antibody, called IgE, reacts with a specific provoking substance called an allergen. The result of this interaction
is an allergic response and the person is deemed allergic to that allergen.

The specific type of antibody involved in classic allergy is called IgE. The proposed antibody mechanism for this type of food allergy does not involve IgE, but a different antibody called IgG. This is significant because standard allergy testing tests only for IgE antibodies. If your child has IgG mediated sensitivity, his allergy test is going to miss it. That means that your child may have a severe allergy to a specific food, but your allergist will tell you he is not allergic to it.

Why the Controversy?

Reason 1: Diagnosis

I said this was a very controversial area of medicine and here is one of the reasons why. Food allergies are very difficult to diagnose. One reason is that the symptoms wax and wane. When a child has a classic allergy, for example to bee stings, then every time a bee stings him, he will have a reaction. Food allergies don’t work that way. There seems to be a threshold that must be exceeded before there are any symptoms. In addition, this threshold seems to vary from day to day. On some days a food will affect the child, and on other days it won’t. Dr. Rapp explains this phenomenon using the analogy of a barrel.

We can view each allergic child as if he has a barrel. As long as the barrel is empty or only partially full, your child will have no problems. Your child won’t become hyperactive until his barrel is overflowing.

Various things will fill your child’s barrel. Let’s say your child is sensitive to chocolate, cats, and peanut butter. Each of these things all can partially fill his barrel. As long as he only has peanut butter or only plays with the cat, his barrel is only partially full. That means that there are no symptoms and that his behavior is fine. Then, one day he has a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, has chocolate ice cream for dessert and plays with the cat all afternoon. These things in combination make his barrel overflow, and by evening he is out of control. Your child has food allergies, but sometimes they affect him and sometimes they don’t.

The barrel can change sizes. If your child has a cold or is upset his barrel gets smaller. It takes less to make it overflow. If he is happy his barrel is bigger. It takes more to make it overflow. If he isn’t eating well and that day he is low on certain nutrients his barrel gets smaller.

Many traditional allergists find this barrel concept ludicrous. It doesn’t fit into the pattern of how other allergies work.

Reason 2: Method of Diagnosis

The next problem is the way in which you test for food allergies. Dr. Rapp describes a technique called provocation-neutralization testing. This method works as follows: Say that a child frequently has headaches after eating eggs. The practitioner will give an intradermal injection of egg extract. If this elicits the child’s headache, then the child tests positive for egg allergy. Other signs of a positive test include an increase in pulse rate of 20 points, a large skin
reaction (this indicates a classic IgE reaction), a change in the child’s handwriting, or some other physical or emotional complaint. This last criterion “some other physical or emotional complaint” is problematic. It is too vague. The result is that when studies compared how several physicians evaluated the same group of patients, their results didn’t agree. For each patient if there were twenty different doctors with twenty different sets of findings. None of their diagnoses matched.

Reason 3: The Mechanism

As I mentioned before, the proposed mechanism is an IgG mediated response. Some food allergists diagnose specific food allergies by measuring IgG levels. This runs counter to all of modern allergy practice.

Allergists give allergy shots to treat allergy. The way this works is they give a low level of allergen, which is not enough to elicit an IgE reaction. The dose is slowly increased until eventually the patient can tolerate a significant exposure to the allergen.

This is how it works. The repeated low-level exposure to the allergen induces the body to make a different antibody to the substance. This antibody attaches to the allergen and deactivates it before IgE can cause the allergy reaction. What is this antibody that allergists try to induce to cure their patients of their allergies? You guessed it, IgG. So the very antibody the traditional allergists have been inducing for decades to successfully treat allergies, the food allergy people claim is the antibody guilty of causing allergies.

For a traditional allergist this is nothing short of heresy. IgG has been used for decades to treat allergies successfully. Comes along Rapp and her friends and they claim that IgG causes allergy? This is a little hard for some people to accept.

Just how strongly do allergists reject this idea? I once tried to contact an Israeli physician who was a food allergy specialist to discuss with him provocation-neutralization testing. I called the hospital where he is on staff and asked to
speak with him. For some reason the operator instead put me through to the head of the Department of Allergy.

I began discussing with him the theory of food allergies, provocation-neutralization testing and IgG testing. He told me that he was the head of a committee of allergists who were in the process of testifying before the Israeli Knesset to get legislation passed to make IgG testing illegal in Israel.

Can you imagine? You visit a prison in Israel. In one cell there is car thief. In the next cell there is a mass murderer. And in the next cell there is a guy who tested some

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